AMST 2505 Resilient Communities: Pathways Forward

What strategies do Muslims employ to recover from personal setbacks, societal pressures, and even internalized Islamophobia? While drawing upon best practices from the field of resiliency education, we will study how Muslims develop healthy coping mechanisms and draw upon their faith to cultivate rich internal lives. We give special attention to how––when faced with adversity––Muslims perform acts of generosity. We reflect on the multigenerational commitment to building resilient communities while maintaining solidarity with non-Muslims. The case studies featured in this course reveal an essential ingredient to human flourishing––American Muslims' unwavering knowledge that they matter, they belong.

· October 10, 2020

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Contributors

Dr. Nathan C. Walker

President, 1791 Delegates
Founder, ReligionAndPublicLife.org

Brittany R. King MA

Delegate, 1791 Delegates
Learning Management System Administrator, ZERO TO THREE

Civic Education for a Common Good

We apply the U.S. Department of Education’s Consensus Statements about Constitutional Approaches for Teaching about Religion

▸ Our approach to religion is academic, not devotional;
▸ We strive for student awareness of religions, but do not press for student acceptance of any religion;
▸ We sponsor the study about religion, not the practice of religion;
▸ We expose students to a diversity of religious views, but may not impose any particular view;
▸ We educate about all religions, we do not promote or denigrate any religion;
▸ We inform students about religious beliefs and practices, it does not seek to conform students to any particular belief or practice.

We apply the American Academy of Religion’s “Religious Literacy Guidelines”

▸ “Religious Literacy Guidelines for College Students.” American Academy of Religion, 2019.
▸ “Teaching About Religion: AAR Guidelines for K-12 Public Schools.” American Academy of Religion, April 2010.

We apply the National Council for the Social Studies C3 Frameworks for Religious Studies

College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards, “Religious Studies Companion Document for the C3 Framework.” Silver Spring, MD: National Council for the Social Studies, 2017.